Friday, June 15, 2012

no. 63 - 1970 american league rbi leaders


Who is the man: Frank Howard is the man! Howard had just completed the third in an absolute scorching trifecta of slugging seasons. Howard was one of the most feared sluggers from 1968-70, playing for a terrible Senators team.

Can ya dig it: Howard looks like he's a second away from spitting.

Right on: Tony Conigliaro is shown with the Red Sox on this card, but with the Angels on his base card.

You these cats are bad mothers: I have no doubt, but we'll wait until their individual cards appear.

Shut your mouth: Boog Powell was the Most Valuable Player in 1970 but gets third-billing on this card. Doesn't seem right.

No one understands him but his woman: Howard hit the last home run for the Senators at RFK Stadium on Sept. 30, 1971. After acknowledging the cheers from the fans, he said after the game, "This is utopia for me."


(A word about the back): There are a couple of players on this list that are completely new to me. Brant Alyea of the Twins and Tony Horton of the Indians. I still need to brush up on players from the '60s.

5 comments:

  1. Tony Horton played several seasons and had some good ones...but never appeared on a Topps card. He attempted suicide during the 1970 season, which ended his career.

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  2. Horton also struck out on Steve Hamilton's "Folly Floater". Amazingly, there's video.

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  3. Tony Horton's total ommission from Topps his alway mystfied me. Even the more famous instances a significant player not having card (Wills, Staub) was only part of their career, they eventually had cards. I wouldn't have know he even exsisted if it were not for my 1970 who's who in baseball. A mysterious guy. Maybe, every once in a while, a player just doesn't fit with the MLB lifestyle, I guess.
    But to his credit he did take the Folly Floater with good humor.

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  4. Not only did Topps omit Tony Horton from their sets in the 1960s, but they didn't have any other Indians' 1st baseman (the position Horton played) on a card during his time as the tribe's regular 1st baseman (1968-70).

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  5. How bizarre about Horton. I'm happy to see a Senator on top of the leader board!

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